ABOUT US
Old Spitalfields Market is a leading shopping and dining destination on the border of the City of London and the fashionable East End. With an exciting mix of cutting-edge brands and world class chefs, the location benefits from high footfall each day of the week.
ABOUT US
Old Spitalfields Market is a leading shopping and dining destination on the border of the City of London and the fashionable East End. With an exciting mix of cutting-edge brands and world class chefs, the location benefits from high footfall each day of the week.
OLD SPITALFIELDS MARKET
There's been a market at Old Spitalfields since 1682 when silk thrower John Balch was granted a patent by Charles II allowing for the sale of 'flesh, fowl and roots.' The fruit and veg market continued until 1991 when it decamped to larger premises in Leyton, at which point the market as we know it today began.
HISTORY
The history of Spitalfields can be traced back to Roman Times and during the redevelopment work a roman cemetery was discovered with some of the most interesting finds now on show in the Museum of London.

TIMELINE

1197

‘The priory of St. Mary of the Spittle’, a medieval hospital, is founded: the first part of the name ‘Spitalfields’ derives from the word ‘hospital’. A market was established on the site in the 13th Century

1682

Charles II grants a Letters Patent to a silk thrower by the name of John Balch, allowing a market for flesh, fowl and roots in Spitalfields.

1700’s

Large numbers of Huguenots settle in the area, bringing with them a new wave of skills. Their silk-making expertise will make ‘Spitalfields Silk’ into a world-famous export.

1800’s

Mass Jewish settlement in Spitalfields combines with the invention of the sewing machine to launch the mechanized clothing trade and introduces bagels to the area. In 1875 Robert Horner, a former market porter, purchases at public auction the lease for the market and by 1887 the beautiful Horner Building that still surround the Market today were complete.

1900’s

The Market thrives as a fruit and vegetable market and in the 1940’s the traders club together and buy a Spitfire fighter plane to aid the war effort. They name it ‘Fruitaition’.

1991

After outgrowing its home for over a century the fruit and vegetable operation moves to Leytonstone. The Market reinvents itself and becomes one of the best loved markets in London with a reputation for high quality unique, designer maker and handmade goods.

2000’s

The new Spitalfields development at Crispin Place and Bishops Square opens next door to Old Spitalfields Market in 2005.

2006

Old Spitalfields Market wins the Time Out award for ‘Best London Market’ two years running.

2011

It was named Private Market of the year and placed for the first time in Event Magazines Top 20 venues.
THE MARKET
Old Spitalfields Market has been an iconic feature of London’s East End for over 130 years. In 2005 a major redevelopment of the Spitalfields Market site preserved the historical Horner buildings and Old Spitalfields Market while bringing a diverse range of independent retails and restaurants to the area.
The market can operate 7 days a week and each day you will find a myriad of interesting stallholders.

Monday to Wednesday, 11am–6pm

General Market with fashion and giftware

Thursday, 8am–6pm

Antiques Market

Friday, 11am–6pm

General Market plus a record fair on the 1st and 3rd week of the Month

Saturday, 11am–6pm

1st Saturday:

So Vintage

2nd Saturday

Record Fair

3rd Saturday

Pop-up Vintage

Last Saturday

Belles and African

Sunday, 9am–5pm

Old Spitalfields Market Traders www.oldspitalfieldsmarket.com
OLD SPITALFIELDS MARKET
There's been a market at Old Spitalfields since 1682 when silk thrower John Balch was granted a patent by Charles II allowing for the sale of 'flesh, fowl and roots.' The fruit and veg market continued until 1991 when it decamped to larger premises in Leyton, at which point the market as we know it today began.
HISTORY
The history of Spitalfields can be traced back to Roman Times and during the redevelopment work a roman cemetery was discovered with some of the most interesting finds now on show in the Museum of London.

TIMELINE

1197

‘The priory of St. Mary of the Spittle’, a medieval hospital, is founded: the first part of the name ‘Spitalfields’ derives from the word ‘hospital’. A market was established on the site in the 13th Century

1682

Charles II grants a Letters Patent to a silk thrower by the name of John Balch, allowing a market for flesh, fowl and roots in Spitalfields.

1700’s

Large numbers of Huguenots settle in the area, bringing with them a new wave of skills. Their silk-making expertise will make ‘Spitalfields Silk’ into a world-famous export.

1800’s

Mass Jewish settlement in Spitalfields combines with the invention of the sewing machine to launch the mechanized clothing trade and introduces bagels to the area. In 1875 Robert Horner, a former market porter, purchases at public auction the lease for the market and by 1887 the beautiful Horner Building that still surround the Market today were complete.

1900’s

The Market thrives as a fruit and vegetable market and in the 1940’s the traders club together and buy a Spitfire fighter plane to aid the war effort. They name it ‘Fruitaition’.

1991

After outgrowing its home for over a century the fruit and vegetable operation moves to Leytonstone. The Market reinvents itself and becomes one of the best loved markets in London with a reputation for high quality unique, designer maker and handmade goods.

2000’s

The new Spitalfields development at Crispin Place and Bishops Square opens next door to Old Spitalfields Market in 2005.

2006

Old Spitalfields Market wins the Time Out award for ‘Best London Market’ two years running.

2011

It was named Private Market of the year and placed for the first time in Event Magazines Top 20 venues.
THE MARKET
Old Spitalfields Market has been an iconic feature of London’s East End for over 130 years. In 2005 a major redevelopment of the Spitalfields Market site preserved the historical Horner buildings and Old Spitalfields Market while bringing a diverse range of independent retails and restaurants to the area.
The market can operate 7 days a week and each day you will find a myriad of interesting stallholders.

Monday to Wednesday, 11am–6pm

General Market with fashion and giftware

Thursday, 8am–6pm

Antiques Market

Friday, 11am–6pm

General Market plus a record fair on the 1st and 3rd week of the Month

Saturday, 11am–6pm

1st Saturday:

So Vintage

2nd Saturday

Record Fair

3rd Saturday

Pop-up Vintage

Last Saturday

Belles and African

Sunday, 9am–5pm

Old Spitalfields Market Traders www.oldspitalfieldsmarket.com